Helping Children Embrace Diversity

The key to a peaceful world is the ability to embrace differences. Children are ladened today with bullying, depression, anxiety, low esteem and a slew of other burdens placed on their "too young for this" shoulders. These problems are rooted in their (lack of) exposure to a norm that might differ from their own.  Educators, parents and anyone responsible for raising children all have a role to play in exposing them to different people, cultures, places and things. And what better way than through storytelling and books. We've compiled a list of 5 books for ages 3-9 that share stories of children with diverse interests, personalities, abilities and cultures as a starting point to embracing diversity.

Sparkle Boy

Sparkle Boy

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4

Casey loves to play with his blocks, puzzles, and dump truck, and he also loves things that shimmer, glitter, and sparkle. Casey’s older sister, Jessie, thinks this is weird. When Casey and Jessie head to the library for story time, Casey proudly wears his shimmery skirt and sparkly bracelet. His nails glitter in the light. Jessie insists that Casey looks silly. It is one thing to dress like this around the house, but going outside as a “sparkle boy” is another thing entirely. What will happen when the other kids see him? This sweet and refreshing story speaks to us all about acceptance, respect, and the simple freedom to be yourself. Shimmery, glittery, sparkly things are fun—for everyone!

The Invisible Boy

Invisible Boy

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4

The story of Brian, the invisible boy, that no one seems to notice. He is never included him in groups, games, or invited to birthday parties. But, something changes when a new child joins his class. When Justin, the new boy, arrives, Brian is the first to make him feel welcome. And when Brian and Justin team up to work on a class project together, Brian finds a way to shine. The Invisible Boy a valuable and important resource in teaching how a simple act of kindness supports inclusion and help quiet or introverted children flourish. The book includes discussion questions and resources for further reading.

 

Wonder

Wonder

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4

August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school―until now. He’s about to enter fifth grade at Beecher Prep, and if you’ve ever been the new kid, then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances? Auggie is a hero to root for, a diamond in the rough who proves that you can blend in when you were born to stand out.

 

Marisol McDonald Doesn't Match / Marisol McDonald no combina

  • Age Range: 4- 8years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3

Marisol McDonald has flaming red hair and nut-brown skin. Polka dots and stripes are her favorite combination. She prefers peanut butter and jelly burritos in her lunch box. To Marisol, these seemingly mismatched things make perfect sense together.

Other people wrinkle their nose in confusion at Marisol—can’t she just choose one or the other? Try as she might, in a world where everyone tries to put this biracial, Peruvian-Scottish-American girl into a box, Marisol McDonald doesn’t match. And that’s just fine with her.

The Name Jar

The Name Jar

  • Age Range: 4- 8years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3

Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name? Having just moved from Korea, Unhei is anxious that American kids will like her. So instead of introducing herself on the first day of school, she tells the class that she will choose a name by the following week. Her new classmates are fascinated by this no-name girl and decide to help out by filling a glass jar with names for her to pick from. But while Unhei practices being a Suzy, Laura, or Amanda, one of her classmates comes to her neighborhood and discovers her real name and its special meaning. On the day of her name choosing, the name jar has mysteriously disappeared. Encouraged by her new friends, Unhei chooses her own Korean name and helps everyone pronounce it Yoon-He

 

Little Proud Kid, one of the largest retailers of multicultural book and toys aimed at teaching children to embrace their own differences and that of others.

Little Proud Kid is a creation of Georgia Lobban, who, experienced firsthand with her own daughter how difficult it can be to find books and toys that reflect the stories and images of ethnic and multicultural children and decided it's time for a change.

www.littleproudkid.com

August 31, 2017 by Georgia Lobban
Older Post

Leave a comment

Please note: comments must be approved before they are published.